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Want to spend less on food in 2016? Bird is the word.

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THE WORLD'S 10 BIGGEST CHEAPSKATES

THE WORLD'S 10 BIGGEST CHEAPSKATES

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How we paid our home off in 9 years

Gary Forman is a good and generous friend. For more than 15 years he has run the DollarStretcher website and impacted millions of families with spot-on financial advice. In this video we chat with Gary about how we paid off our home in 9 years on an average income of just $33,0000 per year. There are really only 3 steps to paying off any debt.

#1 Have a budget

#2 Consult and Maintain your budget every 2 weeks

#3 Be on the same page financially and work together toward the goal.

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Money Magazine article about 20 ways to save on your grocery bill Money Magazine - 20 Ways to Save Hundreds on your Grocery Bill

20 SIMPLE WAYS TO SAVE HUNDREDS ON YOUR GROCERY BILL

Regardless of whether you’re feeding just yourself or a whole family, you probably find that groceries take a big bite out of your paycheck.

Food is the third-largest household expense, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports. And for a family of four, the average monthly tab runs between $568 for the super thrifty to $1,293 for those on a more liberal budget, according to the USDA.

MONEY consulted supermarket-savings experts for strategies that would help you trim the fat, without giving up the foods you love. Employing just a few of these tricks—because let’s face it, you hardly have time to cook let alone turn shopping into a project—can take your bills down by 25%.

In other words, you could realize between $1,700 and $3,900 in annual savings.

Plan Ahead 

1. Do an inventory. Take stock of your pantry and freezer once a month to get a sense of what items you need and what you can skip buying, says Annette Economides, co-author of Cut Your Grocery Bill in Half with America’s Cheapest Family. Her husband and co-author Steve adds, “you don’t want to get in a panic when you’re in the grocery store and impulse buy an item at full price only to go home and find you’ve already got it.” Use an app like Out of Milk to help with your inventory.

2. Plan meals by the ads. “A lot of people make a weekly meal plan and then go look for a deal,” says Steve Economides. “Instead, look first at the deals and plan your meals around what’s on sale. This way, you can get meals for half price.”

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Money Magazine article about 20 ways to save on your grocery bill Money Magazine - 20 Ways to Save Hundreds on your Grocery Bill

20 SIMPLE WAYS TO SAVE HUNDREDS ON YOUR GROCERY BILL

Regardless of whether you’re feeding just yourself or a whole family, you probably find that groceries take a big bite out of your paycheck.

Food is the third-largest household expense, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports. And for a family of four, the average monthly tab runs between $568 for the super thrifty to $1,293 for those on a more liberal budget, according to the USDA.

MONEY consulted supermarket-savings experts for strategies that would help you trim the fat, without giving up the foods you love. Employing just a few of these tricks—because let’s face it, you hardly have time to cook let alone turn shopping into a project—can take your bills down by 25%.

In other words, you could realize between $1,700 and $3,900 in annual savings.

Plan Ahead 

1. Do an inventory. Take stock of your pantry and freezer once a month to get a sense of what items you need and what you can skip buying, says Annette Economides, co-author of Cut Your Grocery Bill in Half with America’s Cheapest Family. Her husband and co-author Steve adds, “you don’t want to get in a panic when you’re in the grocery store and impulse buy an item at full price only to go home and find you’ve already got it.” Use an app like Out of Milk to help with your inventory.

2. Plan meals by the ads. “A lot of people make a weekly meal plan and then go look for a deal,” says Steve Economides. “Instead, look first at the deals and plan your meals around what’s on sale. This way, you can get meals for half price.”

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Experian, #creditchat, Millenial, student, loans, debt, college, university, options, save, money, debtfree Smart Ways to Pay for College #CreditChat with Experian

For many millennials, graduating from college with staggering amounts of student loan debt has become the norm. But it doesn’t have to be. This week, we talked about how to save and pay for college and options to explore to eliminate high student loan balances.  Our panel included:  Steve & Annette Economides – New York Times Best Selling Authors and Founders ofMoneySmartFamily.comKasasaa national brand of free rewards checking accounts offered exclusively at community financial institutions, which reward consumers with ATM refunds nationwide, high interest, and no minimum balance,  Rod Griffin- Director of Public Education at Experian, and Mike Delgado- Social Media Community Manager at Experian.

There's lots of great info on this page:

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Good, morning, america, economides, gibson, charlie, gma, publicity How to Get $18 Million in Free Advertising for your Business, Book or Blog

Coming out of an advertising background was of little value for us as we started promoting our own business and brand. We discovered dozens of hacks to get hundreds of interviews on TV, Radio, Magazines, Newspapers and Blogs. This interviews resulted in hundreds of thousands of dollars in book royalties and millions of visitors to our website. 

Learn how we did it in this podcast. If you want to learn even more, sign up for our Free Media Email list to be notified when our new video course is available.

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Taming Your Grocery Budget with Debt Free Divas

By Toni Husbands - The Debt Free Diva!

I’ve added a new item to my bucket list. Get invited to a home cooked meal at Steve and Annette Economides. She had me at lamb chops...

Steve and Annette have been married for the better part of 3 decades. This frugal family didn’t start out as money masters, but over the years they’ve learned how to do more with the money they had. Annette shares that finding ways to accomplish their goals without debt became a game.

This family started their early years learning to thrive on $835/month and decided from the beginning not to borrow money. Instead, they chose to scour garage sales, negotiate everything, and develop strategies to help them keep more of their hard earned cash.

The Economidies used a secret system to manage their money…well, it’s no secret at all folks. Living on a budget helped this family of 7 live on an average salary of $35,000 and:

  • Pay off their home in 9 years
  • Send all 5 children to college with zero debt
  • Pay cash for all of their cars
  • Take family vacations with no debt strings attached
  • Spend $350/month to feed a family of 7 (no Ramen Noodles for this clan)

tame your grocery bill - DebtFreeDivas.orgLIsten to the Podcast Here:

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Limited income, big family, major savings: Meet the Economides clan

by 

When Steve and Annette Economides got married in 1982, they made a conscious decision to always live below their means. The couple from Scottsdale, Arizona, even made the pact a part of their wedding vows.

Then the car broke down.

This is usually the part in the story where taking on a little bit of debt seems perfectly OK to do. After all, Americans collectively owe nearly $12 trillion in outstanding household debt. Sometimes other alternatives are simply out of reach.

In this case, though, Steve was able to ride a bike to work, so he did – for a solid month. And they saved even harder.

“Friends lent us an occasional vehicle over weekends,” Annette Economides said. “They’re still good friends of ours.”

 

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Back, To, School, Money, Financial, Literacy, Economides, Economics, National, Foundation, Financial, literacy, MoneySmart, Kids, Smart, Money, Ramsey, annette, Steve How back-to-school shopping can teach your kids money lessons

How back-to-school shopping can teach your kids money lessons

Back-to-school shopping represents one of the best opportunities all year for students to learn a few lessons before they return to the classroom — money lessons, that is.

"When they reach their high school years, kids have to be prepared to do some comparison shopping and live within a budget, because they're going off on their own in three to five years and they need to be prepared," said Steve Economides, who with wife Annette heads America's cheapest family, runs moneysmartfamily.com and has written books including "The MoneySmart Family System."

"We're not raising kids; we're raising future adults."

Americans will spend $68 billion during this year's back-to-school season, including back-to-college, according to the National Retail Federation. That's an average of $630 per family for school-age kids and $899 for families with college-bound students.

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